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Maritime Forum

TOPIC: 5 Ways to Motivate Your Filipino Crew

5 Ways to Motivate Your Filipino Crew 12 Mar 2015 11:43 #4403

  • madhubanti
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Each ethnic group has its own peculiarities and hierarchy of needs. The Filipino crew member is unique with his own hierarchy of needs which is not exactly in the same order nor fits perfectly the Western framework of hierarchy of needs.

• In the Filipino hierarchy of needs, the first need is famillsm or the need to belong to a family or group. A Filipino normally sees himself first as member of the family and only secondly as member of the outside group whether it's an office or company. To motivate and bring out the best in the Filipino, it may therefore be to the long-term favour of firms to implement measures that will satisfy their Filipino seamen's concern for their families.

• The second need of the Filipino in the hierarchy is the need to be reciprocated. This is based on the utang-na-loob value, a behavior wherein every service received, favour, or treatment accomplished has something in return. The Filipino has a high sense of personal dignity. His dignity and honour are everything to him, so that the wounding of them, whether real or imagined, becomes a challenge to his manhood. He respects other people but they must also respect him.

• Many a conflict between a foreign superior and a Filipino seaman is founded on a disregard on one hand, and a sacred regard on the other, of individual dignity. The foreigner is apt to underestimate the dignity of the Filipino. He idolizes, perhaps the individual dignity of his foreign superior but he demands the same treatment; if not, he loses his self-control because he feels that he has been wronged or insulted though the cause itself may be trivial or slight.

• According to the findings of Dr. Angelina Ramirez, Filipinos find the following reasons of vital importance in work satisfaction:
(1) He expects to be treated as an individual with dignity.
(2) He wants to carry on an open communication and get feedback from those he works with.
(3) In the context of performance appraisals, he wants to be rated high because the benefits of recognition and promotion go with it.
(4) He wants to be given credit for any participation which results to the productivity of the organization.
(5) He works best with co-workers who are socially supportive.
(6) He wants to be involved in challenging tasks which provide calculated risks but he is resistant to change when new behaviour is required from him which he is not ready for.

• The third need in the Filipino hierarchy of needs is social acceptance, that is to be taken by his fellows for what he is or what they believe him to be, and be treated in accordance with his status.

When a Filipino calls his superior "kuya" (elder brother) or "tatay" (father), although he is not really related to him, he is developing a fictive relationship, that relationships which is neither legal nor by blood, which may make him feel he is one of the members of the officer's family.

• The fourth need in the Filipino hierarchy is the social mobility need. Most Filipinos want to make more money to climb the social ladder. If they are given help to achieve this goal, they will do so. Because of this need, evaluation by an authority or superior would be welcomed but not by subordinates or peers. The Filipino sees his mobility as guaranteed if it were determined by his superior.

• The fifth need in the Filipino hierarchy is pagkabayani ("being a hero"). This is the highest of the need levels. Here enters the values of "honor," "dignity," and "pride." Here enters the value of hiya which in Filipino in the broadest sense is best defined as "self-esteem." This is one of the most important concepts in the social psychology of the Filipino because in it are found almost all of the aspects of the Filipino value and motivation.
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5 Ways to Motivate Your Filipino any Crew in theworld 06 Aug 2016 09:51 #4619

  • Joao Lizardp
  • Joao Lizardp's Avatar
madhubanti wrote:
Each ethnic group has its own peculiarities and hierarchy of needs. The Filipino crew member is unique with his own hierarchy of needs which is not exactly in the same order nor fits perfectly the Western framework of hierarchy of needs.

• In the Filipino hierarchy of needs, the first need is famillsm or the need to belong to a family or group. A Filipino normally sees himself first as member of the family and only secondly as member of the outside group whether it's an office or company. To motivate and bring out the best in the Filipino, it may therefore be to the long-term favour of firms to implement measures that will satisfy their Filipino seamen's concern for their families.

• The second need of the Filipino in the hierarchy is the need to be reciprocated. This is based on the utang-na-loob value, a behavior wherein every service received, favour, or treatment accomplished has something in return. The Filipino has a high sense of personal dignity. His dignity and honour are everything to him, so that the wounding of them, whether real or imagined, becomes a challenge to his manhood. He respects other people but they must also respect him.

• Many a conflict between a foreign superior and a Filipino seaman is founded on a disregard on one hand, and a sacred regard on the other, of individual dignity. The foreigner is apt to underestimate the dignity of the Filipino. He idolizes, perhaps the individual dignity of his foreign superior but he demands the same treatment; if not, he loses his self-control because he feels that he has been wronged or insulted though the cause itself may be trivial or slight.

• According to the findings of Dr. Angelina Ramirez, Filipinos find the following reasons of vital importance in work satisfaction:
(1) He expects to be treated as an individual with dignity.
(2) He wants to carry on an open communication and get feedback from those he works with.
(3) In the context of performance appraisals, he wants to be rated high because the benefits of recognition and promotion go with it.
(4) He wants to be given credit for any participation which results to the productivity of the organization.
(5) He works best with co-workers who are socially supportive.
(6) He wants to be involved in challenging tasks which provide calculated risks but he is resistant to change when new behaviour is required from him which he is not ready for.

• The third need in the Filipino hierarchy of needs is social acceptance, that is to be taken by his fellows for what he is or what they believe him to be, and be treated in accordance with his status.

When a Filipino calls his superior "kuya" (elder brother) or "tatay" (father), although he is not really related to him, he is developing a fictive relationship, that relationships which is neither legal nor by blood, which may make him feel he is one of the members of the officer's family.

• The fourth need in the Filipino hierarchy is the social mobility need. Most Filipinos want to make more money to climb the social ladder. If they are given help to achieve this goal, they will do so. Because of this need, evaluation by an authority or superior would be welcomed but not by subordinates or peers. The Filipino sees his mobility as guaranteed if it were determined by his superior.

• The fifth need in the Filipino hierarchy is pagkabayani ("being a hero"). This is the highest of the need levels. Here enters the values of "honor," "dignity," and "pride." Here enters the value of hiya which in Filipino in the broadest sense is best defined as "self-esteem." This is one of the most important concepts in the social psychology of the Filipino because in it are found almost all of the aspects of the Filipino value and motivation.
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5 Ways to Motivate Your Filipino Crew 02 Sep 2016 06:07 #4637

  • Sanjay Mittal
  • Sanjay Mittal's Avatar
Excellent post. Filipinos are largely friendly people and the important thing is to treat them with respect, specially in public. They do not like to be admonished in front of other personnel.
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