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Maritime Blogs

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All inflatable life rafts have an emergency pack which according to SOLAS requirement, there are SOLAS A and B two type. Here we will learn the difference between SOLAS A and B.

b2ap3_thumbnail_liferaft-equipment-solas-a-pack.jpg

1.Life rafts: Standards of equipment

Life Raft Construction

  • Insulating double wall canopy
  • Insulating Heat Sealed Inflatable Floor
  • Painter/Static Line (Length, 130 ft.)
  • CO2 Inflation System
  • Painter/Static Line Attachment Point
    (1700 lbs. test) (6-10 Person Capacity)
  • Righting Strap
  • Lifelines (Inner)
  • Lifelines (Outer)
  • Exterior Locator Light
  • Interior Light
  • Pressure Relief Valves
  • Large Rectangular Ballast Pockets
  • Retro-Reflective Tape
  • Boarding Ladder
  • Boarding Handholds
  • Static Line Weak Link
  • Canopy Support Arches
  • Sealed Buoyancy Chambers
  • Approved Hydrostatic Release
  • Manual Topping Off Valves
  • Double Layer Storm Doors
  • Fiberglass/Fabric Container
  • Pressure Relief Valve Plugs

Life Raft Equipment

  • Sea Anchor(Automatically Deployed)
  • Floating/Heaving Line (Length 100 ft.)
  • Rain Water Collector
  • Floating Knife
  • Waterproof Equipment Bag
  • Raft Use Instructions
  • Individual Thermal Protective Aids (2 ea.)
  • Paddles
  • Manual Inflation/Bilge Pump
  • Repair Clamps (6 ea.)
  • Adhesive & Patch Repair Kit

Additional equipment required to bring life-raft to SOLAS approved standard. SOLAS A is more comprehensive than SAOLA B!

SOLAS “B” EQUIPMENT:   (in addition to all standard equipment described above)

  • Waterproof Flashlight
  • Spare Flashlight Bulb
  • Spare Flashlight “D” Cell Batteries (3 ea.)
  • Sponges (2 ea.)
  • Bailer
  • SOLAS Parachute Distress Signals (2 ea.)
  • SOLAS Red Handheld Distress Signals (2 ea.)
  • SOLAS Smoke Signal
  • Seasick Bags (1 Per Person)
  • Water Storage Bag
  • Thermal Protective Aid
  • Signal Mirror
  • First Aid Kit
  • Signaling Whistle
  • Anti-Seasickness Pills (6 Per Person)
  • Spare Sea Anchor

SOLAS “A” EQUIPMENT:  (in addition to all standard and SOLAS B equipment described above)

  • Graduated Drinking Cup
  • Drinking Water (6-20 Person Capacity – 1½ Liters Per Person)
  • Food Ration (10 Kilo-Joules Per Person)
  • Can Opener
  • Fishing Kit
  • SOLAS Parachute Distress Signals (2 Add’l, 4 total)
  • SOLAS Red Handheld Distress Signals (2 Add’l, 4 total))
  • SOLAS Smoke Signal (1 Add’l, 2 total)
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A large number of cases reported about the difficulties faced by Indian Seafarer abroad who are recruited and placed on board foreign flag Ships by unlicensed/unauthorized entities.

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 cargoship.jpg

“The tax struc­ture de­feats the en­tire ar­gu­ment of equiv­a­lence of pre-and post-GST era and would add to the tax bur­den of In­dian ship­ping com­pa­nies” 

- Bharat Sheth, deputy chair­man and man­ag­ing di­rec­tor at Great East­ern Ship­ping, told Busi­ness Stan­dard.

In­dus­try in­sid­ers say the cru­cial tax reform may work against do­mes­tic ship­ping com­pa­nies as tax im­po­si­tion at the time of asset cre­ation and dis­crim­i­na­tion be­tween do­mes­tic and for­eign ship­ping firms would dis­cour­age fresh in­vest­ments and erode global com­pet­i­tive­ness.

It remains to be seen how the shipping and logistics sector adapts to the new changes brought about by the GST. Although there are concerns that the sector might be adversely affected.

The Goods and Ser­vices Tax (GST) rate struc­ture is ex­pected to have an ad­verse im­pact on In­dia’s ship­ping in­dus­try. Tax levy to erode global com­pet­i­tive­ness, dis­cour­age fresh in­vest­ments

While the in­dus­try has raised sev­eral points of con­cern in the GST tax struc­ture, a ma­jor is­sue is the levy of 5 per cent in­te­grated GST (IGST) — the tax levied both on in­ter-state sup­ply of goods and ser­vices and im­ports — on im­port of ves­sels and on sale of ships out­side In­dia.

“It (5 per cent levy) sim­ply means that it will raise both our cap­i­tal cost and work­ing cap­i­tal. This is very dis­cour­ag­ing for the in­dus­try,” ex­plained Sheth. Un­der the cur­rent tax regime, the pur­chase or sale of a ship does not at­tract any tax.“ The type of ves­sels ac­quired by the in­dus­try from in­ter­na­tional mar­kets are not built in In­dia and these are mainly sec­ond-hand ac­qui­si­tions of which there is no avail­abil­ity in In­dia,” said Sheth.

Both of the above de­feat the ar­gu­ment of com­pen­sat­ing coun­ter­vail­ing duty and spe­cial ad­di­tional duty for pro­mot­ing In­dian ship­build­ing, Sheth said. The in­dus­try is also con­cerned that firms would not be able to utilise cred­its of such IGST for a long pe­riod of time and credit would thus be­come a cost in their books, ad­versely im­pact­ing their busi­ness op­er­a­tions.

If an In­dian com­pany were to sell a ship to a for­eign buyer, which may per­haps have never en­tered In­dia, then too it is li­able to pay the 5 per cent IGST. Sheth said, “At present, sales out­side In­dia are not taxed as the si­tus of the sale is out­side In­dia. This po­si­tion should ef­fec­tively con­tinue un­der the GST regime, con­sid­er­ing the gov­ern­ment’s in­tent to align rates un­der GST to the present treat­ment.”

Ac­cord­ing to the ship­ping min­istry, around 95 per cent of In­dia’s trading by vol­ume and 70 per cent by value is moved through mar­itime trans­port. Due to this, do­mes­tic ship­ping firms play a key role in the eco­nomic ac­tiv­ity of the coun­try.

In ship­ping busi­ness, ves­sels are high-value as­sets and the to­tal cash flow re­quire­ment for such ac­qui­si­tions is also high. With an ex­tra tax bur­den of 5 per cent, ac­qui­si­tion would only be­come more ex­pen­sive. Sheth said un­der the new rules, there was dis­crim­i­na­tion be­tween In­dian ship­ping com­pa­nies and for­eign ship­ping com­pa­nies in favour of the lat­ter. Ex­ports or im­ports of cargo ser­vices pro­vided to the In­dian con­signor by an In­dian ship­ping com­pany would be li­able for GST due to the cus­tomer be­ing lo­cated in In­dia. How­ever, the same ser­vice by a for­eign ship­ping com­pany will es­cape tax based on the place of sup­ply pro­vi­sions. This would en­cour­age an In­dian char­terer to en­gage a for­eign ship­ping line over an In­dian ship­ping line since the In­dian ship­ping com­pany would have ad­di­tional 5 per cent GST on its to­tal freight invoice. At present, there is par­ity of tax treat­ment be­tween do­mes­tic and for­eign ship­ping com­pany as there is no tax ap­pli­ca­ble.

“Both im­port and ex­port cargo must be zero-rated to plug this is­sue,” said Sheth. Fur­ther, a 5 per cent duty has also been levied on voy­age char­ters with no in­put tax credit pro­vi­sion. In voy­age char­ters, the ship­ping com­pany han­dles the trans­porta­tion of the cargo while in time char­ters, the com­pany leases the ves­sel to the cargo buyer who car­ries out the trans­porta­tion of the cargo. The do­mes­tic ship­ping in­dus­try has made rep­re­sen­ta­tions to the ship­ping min­istry in this re­gard and the mat­ter is ex­pected to be taken up at the GST Coun­cil meet slated on June 3.

“We have al­ready made a rep­re­sen­ta­tion re­gard­ing these is­sues in GST tax struc­ture to the min­istry,” in­formed an of­fi­cial with the sta­te­owned Ship­ping Cor­po­ra­tion of In­dia . Mean­while, the ship­ping min­istry is hope­ful of get­ting the is­sues set­tled with the fi­nance min­istry.

“With this kind of tax regime for the ship­ping in­dus­try, no new in­vest­ments will come to the sec­tor. The in­dus­try is al­ready in the grip of a dif­fi­cult busi­ness cli­mate. This move (GST tax struc­ture) would be even more dis­cour­ag­ing,” a se­nior ship­ping min­istry of­fi­cial said.

 

Understanding GST provisions for shipping industry of India


Currently, if goods are transported as cargo through ships, outbound shipment is considered exports, whereas inbound shipments attract service tax. If transportation is through air, inbound and outbound shipments are not subject to service tax. Tax liability, connected with ancillary items like warehousing, cargo handling, and terminal charges are determined based on taxability of principal service.

Since GST does not specify exclusion for air compared to ocean freight, transactions, when place of supply is inside taxable territory, would be levied with air and ocean freight charges with respect to GST.

“Thus converting logistics and freight forwarding into a supply of services, which includes movement of goods by sea, inland waterways, air, rail, or road. GST on freight depends on whether transportation is national or international”
- Shashank Dixit, CEO, Deskera, a cloud-based business software provider

Moreover, while considering domestic freight, transportation needs to happen from a place in India to another place in the country. Basically, both points of origin and destination have to be in India. On the contrary, International freight rules are applied when transportation takes place and when either place of origin or place of destination or both are outside India.
So, impact is in provisions of ‘Place of Supply’ to determine taxability of cross-border and within-state transactions. According to GST provisions, Place of Supply for transportation is defined as follows: (a) location of recipient if recipient is GST-registered entity; and (b) if recipient is unregistered entity, place of supply deemed as place where goods are given over for transportation.

It remains to be seen how the shipping and logistics sector adapts to the new changes brought about by the GST. Although there are concerns that the sector might be adversely affected.

Article Source: BW Disrupt and Business-Standard.com

Hits: 2161

Posted by on in Maritime Blog

There has a variety of connection methods between Life Raft Hydrostatic Release Unit and the hull. Here will explain the correctness of various connection methods from the principle of release.

When we test the inflatable life raft for new shipbuilding or It’s annual service, we could always find the connections of HRU, painter line and weak link is wrong. The following is a discussion of hydrostatic release unit connection.

Common HRU like picture A.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Life-Raft-Weak-Link-System.jpg

The Painter line of each life raft(except the liferafts that are stored at bow or stern in accordance with SOLAS Chapter III, paragraph 31.1.4) should be connect with hull through HRU and weak link. Common connection method of painter line like picture B and C, the main purpose is, if life raft need to be thrown overboard by man,then the painter line is firmly connected with hull through HRU; in case of ship sinking, the painter line is connected with hull through weak link.

The HRU should automatically release life raft when at a depth of not more than 4 meters under water, and it’s designed that the structure should not be disengaged when subjected to waves. When the ship sank, the life raft sank with the ship, reaching a certain depth (no more than 4 meters), the HRU automatically release, at this time the life raft is connected depends on the painter line and weak link with the hull, life raft will float up by it’s own buoyancy,the painter line that connected with hull will release the life raft subjected to the tension, finally the weak link broken under the tension at 1.8KN ~ 2.6KN and disengage the life raft from the hull.so when inspection, we should check the connection of HRU carefully, otherwise the life raft could not release at an emergency by wrong connection of HRU.

The picture D and E are right connection of HRU, while F and G are wrong.

In picture D and E, the painter line(green one) is connected with HRU through a shackle,and HRU is connected with hull, but the weak like(red one) is connected with shackle on painter line and hull; when HRU released by pressure of water,The shackle on painter line also disengaged from the HRU, at this time the life raft is connected depends on the painter line and weak link with the hull, when the buoyancy is big enough, the life raft will be automatically inflated, and the weak link also broken by tension, then complete the whole procedure of life raft.

In Picture F and G, when HRU automatically released, weak link broken by buoyancy of life raft, but caused by directly connection between the shackle on painter line and the shackle tied on life raft(blue one)(The shackle one side is tied on life raft and another side is connected with cradle, while cradle is welded with hull), not only connected with weak link, so when weak link broken, the painter line still connected with the shackle that tied on life raft, finally the life raft will sink with ship and not released.

Article from: http://www.prosmarine.com/connect-life-raft-hru/

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Unemployment is rising to unprecedented high levels. There are several good policies governments can deploy to tackle it, but there are risks to avoid too. The global economy is in the midst of the worst financial and economic crisis of the past 50 years, with severe consequences for workers and their families.

Since the second half of 2008, major declines in output have occurred in countries everywhere, leading to sharp falls in employment and steep hikes in unemployment. From a 25-year low at 5.6% in 2007, the OECD unemployment rate rose to a postwar high of 8.5% in July 2009, corresponding to an increase of over 15 million in the ranks of the unemployed. In short, OECD countries are facing a jobs crisis. 

When some industries lose workers, they win the consolation prize of empty political promises to turn back time. The loss of these jobs has been devastating to many cities and towns. But department stores have lost 18 times more workers than coal mining since 2001. 

There are several possible explanations. 

  

What happened?

The economy has dramatically shifted in recent years, as labor-saving technology has eliminated the need for millions of workers. Simply, many large companies don’t need as many workers as they used to. Technological advancement has meant less employment for the average Indian. 

 

 

A few exceptions

 If you’ve searched for a job, you’ll probably notice that there are lots of open positions available in growing fields such as tech and healthcare. Unfortunately, the vast majority of people don’t have the specialized training that is required to work in these fields. 

 

What's Next

The next wave of job losses is expected to happen in services: Experts expect the three key services sectors — software services, telecom and BFSI (banking and financial services) — to shed nearly 1.5 million white collar jobs in the 12-18 months. This trend has already begun: in the period July-September last year, the information technology/BPO sector lost 16,000 jobs, according to the Quarterly Employment Survey.

 

 

Words of Principal Officer of MMD Kochi

The photograph of the cadets of TS Chanakya, on hunger strike for a job, is a painful scene for anyone who is connected with the maritime sector and places several questions before all of us. How, the country's premier maritime institute, rated at par with IITs till a few years back reached this shameful state of affairs? Where are we going wrong?

I venture to comment on these questions, albeit with a caveat, that my views expressed here are purely personal and, need not necessarily represent the official position of the organization to which I belong to. Because, I believe this is a classic example, how the progressive government policy initiatives can be hijacked and misused by a few. And, when I refer to recruiting agents or private maritime institutes in this article, I must also place on record my highest respect and regards to our reputed ship management companies who took Indian seafarers to the world shipping map and some of our committed private institutes, who brought world class maritime training concepts to India.

Those who are 40plus, let's go 10-15 yrs down our memory line. Those were the days of seminars after seminars and presentations after presentations, projecting the demand for Indian seafarers ten times in few years. Those were the days of reports after reports from world renowned consultancy groups predicting the growth of Indian shipping to several folds in a decade time. Maritime policy makers vouched in every forum that the world share of Indian seafarers will be reaching 11-12% from the then existing 7% in few years.

Every education industrialist aspired for maritime training institutes and thus maritime training became one of the most lucrative businesses in the education sector, perhaps next to medical education. Maritime training evolved as one of the most expensive amongst all technical courses, with hardly any room for meritorious students who could not pool up several lakhs as fees.

Several shipping companies identified maritime training as a lucrative ancillary industry complementing their core business interests. Revolving restaurants and air-conditioned basketball courts became trademarks of some of our institutes. Our esteemed shipping guests from foreign countries had another sightseeing option- some of our five-star 'resort institutes' in hill stations!!

But, see the situation today- students who spent millions, probably through loans, dreaming lucrative seafaring job are on hunger strike to get a ship for training and a company for employment. Recruiting portfolio became the only growing and arguably the most corrupt sector in shipping. Many notorious 'commission agents' and 'dalals' who used to roam around in seafarer's Club rechristening themselves as 'RPSL Companies'', opened posh offices and openly bargained with desperate junior officers for placements. Even reputed ship management companies went through credibility crisis.

Our maritime prophets who predicted millions of jobs for Indian seafarers went hiding. Our esteemed Consultants who prophesied a startling future for Indian shipping, are now busy in making a more colorful graphical illustration for their next clientele. Our maritime managements gurus are now teaching stress relieving techniques for revalidation courses. Maritime Training Institutes are doing researches on STCW convention to approach Administration with a proposal to start a new short term STCW course.

So, Where did we go wrong?

Friends, most of us failed to remember that shipping is commercial industry, that too cyclical in nature and ships are run for profit and not for charity. It is not the five-star facilities, but, the quality of trainees who come out of these institutes which is going to decide the destiny of India as a seafaring nation. And it is a simple fact that no technology can produce cashew-candy from peanuts. The quality of product depends on the quality of raw material used and no institute can produce world class seafarers if they compromise on the quality of intake for money. And no ship owner will spend a penny on him if he is not worth it!!!

But the real tragedy was that these youngsters who were born and brought up in corruption- first in training and then in placement- carried this culture to the ships. The biggest casualty was the image of Indians as the most disciplined, resilient and technically profound officers onboard. To worsen the situation, came the communication revolution; seafarers withdrew to their laptops & mobiles, leaving the common platforms of smoke rooms and saloons. And the obvious casualty was the essential 'team efforts' on board, which was the trademark of ''All Indians- manned ships''!!
Friends, if the foreign shipping companies migrated in large scale to India in the late 80s, making it as their most favored recruiting hub, it is simply because they wanted Indian seafarers for their competency, and not because of any patriotic relationship with India. Neither did this phenomenon owe to any policy initiatives from the government nor to any marketing strategies from the scores of associations which dictate our policy initiatives of today.

Indian seafarers achieved this envious status because of their professionalism and hard work and as long as they are able to maintain this, they will continue to have a stable space in the international shipping scenario, no matter, what our self-styled ‘maritime prophets’ predict and propagate. On the converse, if our seafarers fail to maintain their standard, both technically and attitudinally, the future of Indian seafaring community is bleak, because we can never compete with China or Burma in terms of cost, but only through our sheer competence and hard work. We, the generation who joined Sea in the late eighties or early nineties were taught that Indian seafarers when took over from Europeans reduced the ship's operational cost, other than salary, by around 30-40%, because, every O-ring they saved or every copper gasket they reused were saving the ship manager in dollars.

Gentlemen, I am afraid this is only the beginning of another unfolding saga, which is going to be more tragic. Because, those who systematically nurtured the mushrooming and proliferation of maritime training institutes in the country, without the backing of any realistic assessment regarding the demand and supply balance, have tasted blood from the rampant corruption in the recruitment of junior level officers. Now they dream of a much more lucrative picture of the Masters and Chief Engineers on hunger strike to get a placement on a ship and thus thrive on the commission racket, it could throw open to them. The recent organized campaign of 'heavy shortage' of senior officers and branding our examiners and examination system as the biggest obstacle in creating a flooded market of certified officers, find its root cause to this greed of some from our own maritime fraternity.

Friends, how close to reality is the recent hue and cry from a section projecting ''heavy shortage'' of senior officers? If at all it is true, dilute the quality of examination and make available the certificates through "Xerox centres" in front of GPO, like many foreign CoCs, is the solution to it? What is the real motive behind the demand for declaring all White-list country CoCs, from Panama to Belize as equivalent to Indian CoC? Is the campaign for permitting foreign nationals on Indian ships justified, when our own junior officers run from companies to companies for a placement?

We will discuss them next time, but till then, you can agree or disagree with me - but please help in creating a healthy discussion on these issues......

 

What Can Be Done? 

Share your views on this in the comment section and let us know, what you think could be done for the improvement. 

 

 

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Warren’s ‘Blue New Deal’ Envisions Phasing Out Offshore Drilling, More Offshore Wind

Senator Elizabeth WarrenBy Joseph Ax NEW YORK, Dec 10 (Reuters) – Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren on Tuesday proposed a “Blue New Deal” to revitalize and protect the world’s oceans, including phasing out all offshore drilling and investing in renewable energy projects like wind turbines. “Our oceans can underpin a sustainable food system, be a source of […]

Monster 74-Foot Wave Measured Off Northern California

Rogue Wave PhotoThe low pressure system that impacted the west coast of the United States over Thanksgiving was generating monster waves rarely observed on the high seas. The wave heights were recorded by a Coastal Data Information Program buoy located off Cape Mendocino in northern California on November 27th, as a strong Pacific storm approached the U.S. […]

Brazil Will Drill Massive Oil Find Despite Climate Concerns

offshore drilling rig brazilBy Jake Spring MADRID, Dec 9 (Reuters) – Brazil will push to expand oil drilling in its massive “pre-salt” oil and gas area off its coast in spite of growing global concerns about climate change, the country’s energy minister told Reuters on Monday. Brazil’s Mines and Energy Minister Bento Albuquerque spoke on the sidelines of […]

Mega-Turbines Sought for Connecticut Offshore Wind Farm

offshore wind farmBy William Mathis (Bloomberg) –When Iberdrola SA builds its offshore wind farm off the coast of Connecticut sometime in the middle of next decade, it plans to use turbines more powerful than anything currently on the market. The Spanish utility’s Avangrid Inc. won an auction to develop the 804-megawatt wind farm in a joint venture […]

DNV GL Signs Broad Strategic Cooperation with China State Shipbuilding

International classification society DNV GL has entered into a new strategic partnership with China State Shipbuilding Corporation (CSSC), the world’s largest shipbuilding group, to develop new systems related to alternative fuels and environmentally friendly technologies, new vessel designs, digitalization, and cyber security in the shipping industry. The strategic partnership will focus on developing future-proof solutions […]

Incident Video: APL Containership Collapses Crane at Port of Antwerp

A giant ship-to-shore container crane at the Port of Antwerp collapsed Monday after it was struck by a containership in heavy weather. The accident took place Monday afternoon shortly after the APL Mexico City had berthed. According to reports, high wind caused the ship to break free from its moorings and drift into the crane. […]

Enbridge, Enterprise to Develop Deepwater Crude Export Terminal in Gulf of Mexico

vlcc tankerHOUSTON, Dec 9 (Reuters) – Enterprise Products Partners LP and Enbridge Inc have agreed to jointly develop a U.S. Gulf Coast crude export terminal that would load supertankers off Freeport, Texas, Enbridge said on Monday. The pipeline operators plan to finalize a deal that would provide Enbridge an option to purchase ownership interest in Enterprise’s […]

MSC Goes Green with Biofuel Blend to Power Its Fleet

MSC GulsunOne of the world’s largest shipping lines, MSC Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC), has opted to begin using biofuel blends to power its fleet, becoming the first major ocean carrier to do so. The decision by MSC follows successful trials with biofuel blends earlier this year. The trials were completed using a 10 percent blended bunker […]

John F. Kennedy Aircraft Carrier Christened at Newport News Shipbuilding

The U.S. Navy’s newest supercarrier John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) was christened Saturday during a ceremony at Huntington-Ingalls Industries’ Newsport News Shipbuilding in Virginia. The John F. Kennedy is the second aircraft carrier of the Gerald R. Ford class and is slated to replace USS Nimitz (CVN 68) when it is decommissioned. As the ship’s […]

U.S. Navy Faced with Second Deadly Shooting This Week

Dec 6 (Reuters) – Three people were killed by a shooter on Friday at Naval Air Station Pensacola, a major U.S. Navy base in Florida, before sheriff’s deputies fatally shot the shooter, authorities said, the second deadly shooting at a U.S. military installation this week. An “active shooter” was encountered on the base on Friday […]

Golden Bollard 2017
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